Katana, a tad long but worth it - Wrist Twisters
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 05-07-2013, 12:21 PM Thread Starter
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Katana, a tad long but worth it

If your into metal working worth the time, music almost drove me nuts. Then it all just melded together.

Making of a katana - YouTube

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post #2 of 7 Old 05-07-2013, 12:38 PM
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I watched the whole thing, very cool. I dug the music too, but I've an existing appreciation for Japanese arts and culture.

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post #3 of 7 Old 05-07-2013, 02:57 PM
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I watched the whole thing, very cool. I dug the music too, but I've an existing appreciation for Japanese arts and culture.

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post #4 of 7 Old 05-07-2013, 03:01 PM
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That was an interesting watch. Wonder if modern ways of making a katana is an improvement vs ancient methods. You would think so, but I don't know squat about metal work.

Question in general who works with metal. Is the idea of hammering the metal thin, for the lack of better terms, to compress and break out the weak metal?

Thanks for sharing Rich, I dig these insight videos very much.

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post #5 of 7 Old 05-07-2013, 03:37 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewebay1 View Post
That was an interesting watch. Wonder if modern ways of making a katana is an improvement vs ancient methods. You would think so, but I don't know squat about metal work.

Question in general who works with metal. Is the idea of hammering the metal thin, for the lack of better terms, to compress and break out the weak metal?

Thanks for sharing Rich, I dig these insight videos very much.
The old method is rather amazing if you read up on it, quite fascinating.

Here's the quick read from wiki
Katana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I believe the person in that video just used a good grade of steel.
The making of steel for the sword bordered on 'religion'.
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post #6 of 7 Old 05-07-2013, 04:03 PM
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Cool vid, thanks for sharing Rich!

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post #7 of 7 Old 05-07-2013, 05:23 PM
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Really cool vid, showing a much more modern take on katana construction.

My Dad made a lot of knives and guns from scratch, and always worked with metal. My great grandfather was a Smithy. Still have some shovels he made!

A lot of the forging and hammering, with a number of heating and cooling cycles (like dipping the heated metal in a cooling bath of varying liquids) helps to align the steel at a molecular level, thus strengthening it.

Things got really cool with the creation of a Damascus type steel, also known as "folding" steel. The metal is heated, folded over on itself, and hammered, again and again, sometimes adding charcoal in an attempt to carbonize it, before they really knew scientifically why they were adding charcoal. They just knew the steel turned out to be very good.

Here's a quick link, Im sure there are better ones on Google.

http://www.thearma.org/essays/damascus-steel.html

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